The Taiwan International Documentary Festival (TIDF), originally named as Taiwan International Documentary Biennale, was founded in 1998. The TIDF is a biannual festival only held in even years, in order to avoid colliding with the Yamagata International Documentary Film Festival in Japan (founded in 1989, it’s also the first documentary festival in Asia), hoping to offer more space for documentary filmmakers.

The Taiwan International Documentary Festival (TIDF), originally known as the Taiwan International Documentary Biennale, was founded in 1998. The TIDF is a biannual festival held in even years, in order to avoid colliding with the Yamagata International Documentary Film Festival in Japan (or YIDFF, founded in 1989, it’s also the first documentary festival in Asia), hoping to offer more space for documentary filmmakers.

The YIDFF was also seen as a model for the TIDF in its early stage. The TIDF staff laid the foundation for its development by attending the YIDFF, taking the opportunity to invite documentary directors to Taiwan for participation. The TIDF used to be subordinated to the Council for Cultural Affairs and was founded by the late legislator Wang Tuo, the journalist Li Chi, as well as the filmmakers such as Jiing Yng-ruey, Chang Chao-Tang, Edmond Wong, and Wang Shaudi. With the rising of social awareness in the late 1990s, the founding members created a space outside the mainstream, a festival that is more relevant to social and human interests, as well as critical views.

The YIDFF was also seen as a model for the TIDF in its early stage. The TIDF organisers laid the foundation for its development by attending the YIDFF, taking the opportunity to invite documentary directors to Taiwan for participation. The TIDF used to be subordinated to the Council for Cultural Affairs, and was founded by the late legislator Wang Tuo, the journalist Li Chi, as well as the filmmakers such as Jiing Yng-ruey, Chang Chao-Tang, Edmond Wong, and Wang Shaudi. With the rising of social awareness in the late 1990s, the founding members created a space outside the mainstream, a festival that is more relevant to social and human interests, as well as critical views.

In 2014, the TIDF executive team established its permanent office under the Taiwan Film Institute, along with two new categories added, the Asian Vision Competition and the Chinese Documentary Award, hoping to boost the development of documentaries from Asian countries and the Chinese-speaking world. During the 20 years the TIDF has been through, documentaries have started finding their way into the market and get to further interact with the audience. Many well-known directors also started their filmmaking career with documentaries. For instance, Chung Mong-Hong, who received Best Director Award at Golden Horse for his film The Fourth Portrait in 2010, made his first full-length documentary Doctor in 2006. Another documentary filmmaker, Huang Hsin-yao, won Best New Director at the 2017 Golden Horse Awards for his The Great Buddha+, which was selected as the Taiwanese entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 91st Academy Awards.

In 2014, the TIDF executive team established its permanent office under the Taiwan Film Institute, along with two new categories added, the Asian Vision Competition and the Chinese Documentary Award, hoping to boost the development of documentaries from Asian countries and the Chinese-speaking world. During the 20 years of the TIDF’s existence, documentaries have started finding their way into the market, further interacting with the audience. Many well-known directors also started their filmmaking career with documentaries. For instance, Chung Mong-Hong, who received Best Director Award at Golden Horse for his film The Fourth Portrait in 2010, made his first full-length documentary Doctor in 2006. Another documentary filmmaker, Huang Hsin-yao, won Best New Director at the 2017 Golden Horse Awards for his The Great Buddha+, which was selected as the Taiwanese entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 91st Academy Awards.